Youth Programs

C.A.M.P

CHILD ADVOCACY
MENTORING PROGRAM

Provides students, the majority of whom

are in K-12th grade, with enrichment

experiences, mentoring, and life skills development.

These programs typically occur after school and are in collaboration with 

our partners.

The curriculum provides us with the tools to help participants develop the following fundamental skills and more:

 

• Communication 

• Decision making 

• Goal setting

GRADES K-12

According to a study published in 2015 by Child

Trends, some 5 million children, or roughly 7percent

of all children living in the U.S, have a parent who

is currently or previously incarcerated. Our children

and youth programs focus directly on meeting the 

needs of children during the time their parents

are incarcerated. Our goal is to reduce the pain

and stigma experienced by children, improve communications between the child and the

incarcerated parent(s), and make visitation with the 

incarcerated parent more child-friendly and less traumatic.

GRADES K-12

Program Desired Outcomes:

• Participants will become aware of how their background and experiences affect the way they view the world and interact with other people in their family and community.

• Participants will identify and practice the kind, caring, and responsible behaviors that go into being a productive and respectful family and community member.

 

 

To learn more and sign up for this 12-week program click here.

More Programs

THE

MIX

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

SCIENCE MUSEUM OF VIRGINIA

MIX members work with mentors to learn about 3D design, robotics, electronics, computer science, and

more. There will also be family-focused activities offered with "THE MIX"

To learn more and sign up for this 8-week program fill out a form here

GRADES 8-12

A BETTER DAY TO CLIMB

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

BEYOND BOUNDARIES

GRADES 6-12

A better day to climb and Beyond Boundaries are exploring program collaborations to develop new and empowering ways to bridge the gap between parents and their kids after they have been separated.

 

To learn more and sign up for this pilot program fill out a form here.

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

VCU RAMBIKES

GRADES 6-12

Our Build-A-Bike Workshop

is dedicated to promoting

bicycling as a safe, fun, efficient, and environmentally friendly transportation alternative for the kids in our Child Advocacy Mentorship Program.

To learn more and sign up for this 8-week program fill out a form here

BUILD

-A-

BIKE

FACTS

The growing number of children with an incarcerated parent represents one of the most significant collateral

consequences of the record prison population in the U.S. (1)

More than 2.7 million children in the U.S. have an incarcerated parent. That is 1 in 28 children. (2)

One in 9 African American children (11.4%), 1 in 28 Hispanic children (3.5%), and 1 in 57 white children (1.8%) in the United States have an incarcerated parent. (3)

Approximately half of children with incarcerated parents are under ten years old. (4)

Children whose parents are incarcerated are five to six times more likely to be incarcerated than are their peers. They are inadvertent victims of their parents’ crimes and many find themselves deprived emotionally, socially, and financially—particularly when a parent is incarcerated. (Oregon Department of Corrections)

Children between the ages of 7-10 may experience developmental regressions, poor self-concept, acute traumatic stress reactions, and impaired ability to overcome future trauma. Children from ages 11-14 may experience rejection on limits of behavior and trauma-reactive behaviors.  Children from the ages of 15-18 may experience a premature termination of dependency relationship with parent, and it may lead them to intergenerational crime and incarceration. (5)

FACT RESOURCES

1 Bernstein, N., All Alone in the World, Children of the Incarcerate, 2005
2 The Pew Charitable Trusts: Pew Center on the States. Collateral Costs: Incarceration’s Effect on Economic Mobility. Washington, DC. 2010
3 The Pew Charitable Trusts: Pew Center on the States. Collateral Costs: Incarceration’s Effect on Economic Mobility. Washington, DC. 2010
4 Mauer, M., Nellis, A., Schirmir, S.; Incarcerated Parents and Their Children-Trends 1991 - 2007, The Sentencing Project, Feb. 2009

5 Travis Jeremy, Elizabeth McBride, and Amy Solomon. Urban Institute Justice Policy Center. Families Left Behind: The Hidden Costs of Incarceration and Reentry, 2005.

VOLUNTEER!

CONTACT

LeTeisha Gordon  

804.214.6155

abetterdayassoc@gmail.com

A Better Day Than Yesterday Iniative  Program 

​P.O. Box 7629, Henrico, VA 23231

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